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Brotherly Love: A Semi-Heartwarming Gamestop Story

purple-controller.jpg

Two teenage brothers (~17 and 13) went to a Gamestop to pick out a game and controller for the younger one, who insisted he wanted a game with a female protagonist and a purple controller. Then the father comes in and is all, "Oh hell no you ain't getting that girly shit!" And that's when the Parenting purple participation ribbon recipient got PUT IN HIS PLACE by his oldest son. Oh snap, was this at the mall? I would've socked him with a big pretzel!

They picked out Mirror's Edge, and the little boy also chose a purple controller -- his favorite color.


Just as they were about to check out, their father came into the store and ordered the little boy to pick a "manlier" game with more guns, and put back the purple controller, or else he'd "whoop him."

The older brother stepped in, telling their dad, "It's my money, it's my gift to him, if it's what he wants I'm getting it for him, and if you're going to hit anyone for it, it's going to be me."

The dad backed down and left the store, and the big brother and GameStop manager Kristen comforted the young kid and told him there was nothing wrong with the stuff he picked out.

You know, it really breaks my heart to know there are such f***ing failure at life parents out there still pulling shit like this. I...really think I need to go have a conversation with this guy. A silent one. "You're not gonna say anything?" Not a single word. "Just kick him in the head?" Wearing nothing but high heels and women's panties.

Heartwarming GameStop Story of the Day [geeks.thedailywh.at]
and
Dear Customer who stuck up for his little brother [sweetupndown] (from the employee who witnessed it)

Thanks to Josselyn, Mark, 0 v 0 and Katie, who agree there should be some sort of parenting test you have to take before having a child. Like a driving test, but way, WAY harder (I just saw the guy across the street take out both his trashcans trying to backout of the driveway).

There are Comments.
  • I want the purple controller :( 

  • Ralidius

    At last we know; it is sooooo cool to reference how it is deserving to be violent towards someone because they don't like a color their son picked for whatever reason. Thanks for clearing that up for me on MLK Jr. Day.

  • Mirror's Edge is a great game and purple is a cool color. 

  • taran420

    Purple is the color of royalty and nobility.

  • taran420

    Purple is the color of royalty and nobility.

  • cabbo

    That kid has balls of valarian steel. He is Jon Snow.

  • cabbo

    THE CHILD IS JON SNOW.

    Kid must have had his own troubled childhood to turn 'round and say that to his dad. Also, balls of valarian steel and holy fuck he's Jon Snow.

  • Ok, all you metrosexual 20-somethings who don't have kids, it looks like a gotta be the bad guy here...

    The most likely scenario is that this father took his two boys to Gamestop on the weekend, because parents don't take their kids to Gamestop on school nights.

    If he's taking his kids to Gamestop on the weekend, odds are he's a divorced father, because divorced fathers always take their son's to Gamestop on their weekends with the kids. 

    That means that the boys live with their mom during the week.

    Their mom hates their dad. I mean, she really hates him. She hates him so much, that when she looks at the boys and sees the resemblance to their father, she gets angry. The little boy probably looks like his father the most, so to offset her hatred, she does everything in her power to negate any influence the father may have on his boys. She deliberately encourages interests that are contrary to that of the dad. For example, if the dad likes football or hockey, she encourages gymnastics or skating. If the dad plays ACDC in the car, she plays Katy Perry. And so on, and so on...

    Anyway, the "little boy" who spends most of his time with this overbearing mother, is developing under her influence, and he's taking a shine to the less masculine things his mom encourages.

    However, the older brother grew up when his parents were still married, and has been influenced by the masculine nature of his dad, which enabled him to STAND UP to his dad, and be willing to take the whooping. The whooping that NEVER happened by the way, because, as pissed off as his dad was that the little brother got the girl game and controller, he really respected the older son for "manning up" and defending his brother.

    Sunday night, when the kids got home, at some point the mother called one of her friends or talked to her new boyfriend or husband within earshot of the boys, and she referred to the boys' dad as an "asshole." And thus the cycle of dysfunction continues.

    Don't worry. The boys'll be fine. The older brother will end up like his dad, the younger brother will probably have a successful career in retail management, and all will be well.

  • Mike Graves

    You are making a huge base of assumptions based on your own experiences, or how you would see them for your self and children. But in the end, this is a man who walked up to his son and said put that girls game and controller back or ill hit you later for it, if it was light hearted gesture the older son would know it because he has more experience with his family and would not be that inclined to step in, but he did. Meaning he actually would beat him for buying something feminine. 

    If you are a competent parent you accept your children as they are no matter what even if they like boys rather then girls.On another note this father probably wanted the game he wanted to play, not what his son wanted to play. So being that is probably the case he is just a selfish prick whom should not have children ever, seeing as he would hit his child for that kind of reason, or even at all within reason.

  • Sounds like some frustrated divorced father is projecting.

    Your reasoning falls short at "If he's taking his kids to Gamestop on the weekend, odds are he's a divorced father, because divorced fathers always take their son's to Gamestop on their weekends with the kids." 

    Assuming that you're right, and "divorced fathers always take their sons to Gamestop on the weekends" (which isn't true of my divorced father, but I digress), it doesn't follow that all fathers taking their children to Gamestop are divorced. Married dads take their kids out to buy games on the weekends, too.

    Your assert that the boy's mother hates men and is trying to feminize her son completely out of thin air. You're making the assumption that any effeminate boy is effeminate instead of masculine because of A) a lack of male influence, B) an oppressive feminine influence, or C) both. This is false, and I can pull studies proving so if you'd prefer.

    Continuing on my rant, I assert that it's unlikely that the dad is divorced. Why? Let's say this dad only sees the kids on the occasional weekend. Let's say he's really worried about the influence the mother is having on his youngest son.

    In the story, the dad left the kids alone in the store for a long enough period of time for a store clerk to notice them aimlessly looking at shelves, go through a variety of games with female protagonists and pick out the one best suited to the kid, and then find him a purple controller. 

    I don't know about you, but if I only saw my kids for 4 days each month I wouldn't drop them off at a store and then leave them there for 10, 20 minutes while I waited in the car. I would want to be there with them and help pick out games, take the time to bond with them. And attempt to make my son more masculine, if that was one of my priorities. I imagine most people would try to spend all the time they could with their kids, if their time was limited--so why did the dad leave them alone in the store for so long?

    One last thing. Even if the boy is coming from that type of hostile environment, and wanted a girl-colored controller and female-centric game because his mother encouraged him to hate himself--you imply that he's incapable of "manning up" because of his mother's influence. In the story, the boy repeatedly said "But Dad, this is the game I want." without backing down. Yes, he did start crying, but he never put the game back or folded to appease his angry father. That's "manning up" to me, and in your hypothetical little projection he didn't need his angry father's influence to do it.

  • First of all, you're trying wedge my comments into a logical syllogism. When I say "divorced dads always take their kids to Gamestop on the weekends", it's a colloquial turn of phrase, not meant to be taken literally, nor is it meant to exclude any non-divorced men from the equation. Any literal interpretation would be absurd. You should know better.

    Second, no, I'm not projecting. I take my kid to Gamestop all the time, because I too like Gamestop. Often I tell him he can't get what he wants. Occasionally, he pouts about it, but not often. He never asks for "girls" games, but if he did, I'd tell him no. If his mom wants to buy one for him, fine, no objection, but I wouldn't get him one, just as she wouldn't get him a fighting game. 

    I never said the mother "hates men". You did. (You're projecting your own stereotypes). I said she hates her ex-husband. It happens pretty often.

    I never said "effeminate boy" You did. (You're projecting your own stereotypes). I said he likes less masculine things. It happens. My kid used to like to play his sister's copy of Cooking Mama. I'd roll my eyes, but that'd be about all I'd say.

    I also never used the term "hostile environment" or said that the mom "encouraged the boy to hate himself". Jesus, man, your interpretation is WAY more brutal than what I actually wrote. Maybe your dad SHOULD have taken you to Gamestop so you could get something that let you work out all of your pent-up aggression!

    We don't know how long the guy left the kids in the store. No time was given. You made up "long enough for a store clerk to notice them wandering around". Have you ever BEEN to a Gamestop?! The clerks are in your face instantly! Especially unattended kids. And they won't leave you alone! Also, when the kids were checking out, they were likely asked if they had  Gamestop card, wanted to subscribe to the Gamestop Rewards program, and asked if they wanted to pre-order some soon-to-be-released game. It happens. Every. Friggin'. Time.

    But I love letting my kid do things on his own. Independence is a good thing. You wanna be a helicopter parent? Go ahead. 

    The truth is: You don't know anything about having or raising kids. You haven't done it yet. You've just read about it or observed it. I'm not criticizing you, per se. But you're going to learn eventually how both comical and obnoxious it is when a non-parent tries to school you on being a parent.

    I didn't criticize the "little boy" for not "manning up". Little boys can't "man up"; they're too young. What he did was pouted and had a tantrum because he wasn't getting his way. That's what little kids do. The older boy, if the story is true (which it probably isn't), is learning how to be courageous - good for him. He learned well. Unlike you, perhaps, and many others here, you seem to think he learned it DESPITE his dad's influence, and I suggest he learned it BECAUSE of his dad's influence.

    The story is at best an exaggeration, but more likely an urban myth, and the moral is that men (the cave-dwelling dad) are soulless homophobic brutes. Its a tired device to make some rare devient behavior seem more common than it really is, and to preach some kind of morality (sweet store manager Kristen) to counter it. Nuns at Catholic Schools used to use it to scare kids away from sex, etc.. The stereotypes in the story are about as subtle as a parade. The story line is straight out of "William Wants a Doll" from the 1970s kids show "Free to Be You and Me". I just tried to provide and equally unverifiable, yet plausible, other-side-to-the-story that they never show on Sesame Street.

  • AtomicMug

    Ok, all you metrosexual 20-somethings who don't have kids, it looks like a gotta be the bad guy here...

    The most likely scenario is that this father took his two boys to Gamestop on the weekend, because parents don't take their kids to Gamestop on school nights.

    If he's taking his kids to Gamestop on the weekend, odds are he's a divorced father, because divorced fathers always take their son's to Gamestop on their weekends with the kids. 

    That means that the boys live with their mom during the week.

    Their mom hates their dad. I mean, she really hates him. She hates him so much, that when she looks at the boys and sees the resemblance to their father, she gets angry. The little boy probably looks like his father the most, so to offset her hatred, she does everything in her power to negate any influence the father may have on his boys. She deliberately encourages interests that are contrary to that of the dad. For example, if the dad likes football or hockey, she encourages gymnastics or skating. If the dad plays ACDC in the car, she plays Katy Perry. And so on, and so on...

    Anyway, the "little boy" who spends most of his time with this overbearing mother, is developing under her influence, and he's taking a shine to the less masculine things his mom encourages.

    However, the older brother grew up when his parents were still married, and has been influenced by the masculine nature of his dad, which enabled him to STAND UP to his dad, and be willing to take the whooping. The whooping that NEVER happened by the way, because, as pissed off as his dad was that the little brother got the girl game and controller, he really respected the older son for "manning up" and defending his brother.

    Sunday night, when the kids got home, at some point the mother called one of her friends or talked to her new boyfriend or husband within earshot of the boys, and she referred to the boys' dad as an "asshole." And thus the cycle of dysfunction continues.

    Don't worry. The boys'll be fine. The older brother will end up like his dad, the younger brother will probably have a successful career in retail management, and all will be well.

  • Dude, if you want to assume things based on no evidence and be a sexist asshole about it, that's your prerogative. But seriously, look at how many times you said "probably" there. That alone should be a clue you have no idea what you're talking about. You talk about what happened before, what happened after, what their family situation and home life is... All based on what are clearly your own issues. 

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  • Closet Nerd

    My crayon tastes like purple!
    ..... just sayin

  • Azariel_z

    I like Purple too.. is not a "girly" color, but who knows the father must have issues.. 
    Go older brother...!!

  • Hannah Skoonberg

    Heartwarming? More like these two kids get to go home to their abusive dad where he can beat them later without the public eye forcing him to step down.

  • Kimberly Fischer

    What a big man that must take to threaten his thirteen year old son because he thinks that somehow a feminine assigned game with a purple controller both hold the magical powers to turn him womanly. But the moment his seventeen year old stands up to him? Of course he turns tail. I think the person that really needs a good ass kicking is the dad. 

  • Ralidius

    So he should of punched out the 17 year old and be a real man... what are you on about if there is no other logical escape to your own conclusion other than a violent act. You actually end up with a sugestion for it... amazing stuff. MLK Jr spirit lives on Folks!

  • Mirrors edge kicked ass, imo. Also, I like the color purple.

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