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Crackpot!: Physicist Convinced Crop Circles Are Made With Microwaves, NOT Aliens

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Richard Taylor is a physicist. One who's convinced crop circles are somehow made with microwaves. You mean like dragging one behind a donkey on a rope? Because that I could see. Kidding, I can't actually see anything. Get it? I've got a cucumber eye mask on!

In his report, Taylor cites the work of BLT research, which has researched crop circles using scientific techniques for decades. Initially attempting to discover what was assumed to be a natural phenomenon, BLT found a host of anomalies that lead many researchers to rule out natural phenomena or human involvement. One of these anomalies is the discovery of microwave radiation in some of the crop circles.


He speculates that perhaps they are using a microwave device to soften the crop so they can lay them down easier, possibly making their job more efficient. He says some of the parts to create the radiation can be powered by 12-volt batteries. He doesn't claim to know for a fact that this method is being used. However, he does plan to test his theory in the coming weeks near Stonehenge, an area known for nearby appearances of crop circle formation.

Don't waste your time, Dick. I can tell you right now microwaves don't make crop circles -- they make Hot Pockets. Unfortunately, sometimes they don't cook the middle all the way through and that makes the Geekologie Writer angry. *banging half-frozen pocket against microwave door* YOU THINK I WON'T DEFROST A TOASTER IN YOU AGAIN?!

Crop Circle Microwave Anomalies Acknowledged By Scientists [huffingtonpost]
and
Are Crop Circles Made By Microwaves? [cenblog]

Thanks to Aaron R., who's convinced crop circles are made with artificial ingredients DESPITE THEIR PACKAGING CLEARLY STATING THEY'RE ALL ORGANIC. For shame.

There are Comments.
  • The Magnificent Newtboy

    "was assumed to be a natural phenomenon" or in other words a guy in field with a stick and a string.

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